General

The World’s Most Aggressive Wild Dogs

Between 16 and 32,000 years ago, dogs were domesticated from wild wolves. Over the past 10,000 years, keeping domesticated dogs as companions has been a common practice in many cultures. Despite this, there are still hundreds of dog breeds that are either semi-domesticated or entirely wild. This article presents 10 of the most dangerous breeds.

1. The African Wild Dog

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African wild dogs (also known as Cape wild dogs, African hunting dogs, bat-eared dogs, African painted dogs and painted wolves) are medium-sized canines native to sub-Saharan Africa. They are social animals that tend to live in packs.

The African wild dog is solidly built and extremely athletic. They are intelligent hunters and can run at speeds of up to 41 mph for 10 to 60 minutes at a time. When hunting in packs, one male will attack first by grabbing a prey item by the nose. The pack then joins him and usually kills its prey within five minutes. However, when hunting larger prey (wildebeest, warthogs, etc.), a pack of wild dogs may struggle for 30 minutes or more to bring down an animal.

The African wild dog in brief

Area of origin: Sub-Saharan Africa
Size: 24-30 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 40-79 lbs
Lifespan: About 11 years

2. Asian wild dog

Asian wild dogs (also known as dholes, red dogs and mountain wolves) are undomesticated canines native to India and other countries in Central and South Asia. They are medium-sized, athletic and very physically tough. They tend to live in large packs and are said to resemble a mixture of dogs and foxes. However, genetic studies have determined that these animals did not evolve from foxes or domestic dogs.

Depending on their climate, dholes may have smooth coats or be hairy. Those that inhabit the Himalayan region of India tend to have a thicker, coarser coat, while dholes in central and southern India generally display a smoother coat. This species has a unique method of marking its territory: the males do the “handstand” to urinate on the tree trunks in their territory.

Depending on their climate, dholes can have smooth or hairy coats. Those living in the Indian Himalayan region tend to have a thicker, rougher coat, while dholes in central and southern India generally have a smoother coat. This species has a unique method of marking its territory: males do the “handstand” to urinate on tree trunks in their territory.


Dholes are formidable hunters and can take down prey up to 10 times their size. They can run up to 34 miles per hour, jump up to two meters high and climb some trees. They are social animals and often communicate with a melodious howl. Puppies are fed first after hunting and are cared for by adult males and females.

The Asian wild dog in brief

Area of origin: India, Central and South Asia
Size: 17 to 22 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 22-46 lbs
Lifespan: About 10 years

3. Australian Dingo


Australian dingoes have been described as a wolf in the form of a dog. Their origin is unclear, but many experts believe they are a mix of wolves and primitive domestic dogs brought to Australia from Asian countries.


In the wild, they live in packs and feed on both scavenged meat and live prey. They are naturally very healthy, athletic and robust. Although they are wild animals, they are friendly when domesticated and are sometimes kept as pets.

Australian Dingo In a few words


Area of origin: Australia
Size: 23 inches at the shoulder on average
Weight: 29-44 lbs
Lifespan: 15 to 20 years

4. New Guinea Song Dog

The New Guinea Song Dog inhabits the rainforests of the island that gave it its name. Known for its unique vocalizations, the Song Dog communicates with a distinctive howl that increases in frequency throughout its duration. This breed is small to medium in size compared to other wild canines, but it is still quite resilient and very active.


Song dogs are able to climb trees and turn their heads 180 degrees backwards. They hunt in packs like other wild dogs, but most live in pairs rather than large groups.

The New Guinea singing dog: some facts

Area of origin: New Guinea
Size: 12 to 18 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 20 to 31 lbs
Lifespan: 15 to 20 years

5. Yala Sri Lankan Dog

Yala Sri Lankan dogs live in the Yala National Park area. Their origins are mysterious, but some believe they are a mixture of Sri Lankan golden jackals and primitive Sri Lankan dogs. Yala dogs have been observed living and interacting with golden jackals inside the national park.

The Sri Lankan Yala dog in brief

Home range: Yala National Park area, Sri Lanka
Size: 17 to 22 inches at the shoulder
Weight: Between 10 and 15 kg
Lifespan: No data available.

6. Indochinese dingo

The Indochinese Dingo is a primitive, semi-wild dog breed that originated in the mountainous regions of Vietnam. They were purposely developed by the locals to protect livestock and help hunt wild boar and other food animals. Despite their relationship with humans, they are still considered primitive dogs and are not yet domesticated.

The Indochinese dingo in a few words

Area of origin: Taiwan
Size : 15 to 20 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 26-44 lbs
Lifespan: 10-14 years

7. Hierran Wolfdog


Hierran wolfhounds are an ancient breed. Their origin is unclear, but it is generally believed that they originated on the Canary Islands in Spain. They resemble a small wolf and have been used as herding dogs despite their designation as a “wild” breed. Compared to other wild dogs, they are medium sized, healthy, active and athletic. As a companion, the Hierran Wolfdog is loyal and intelligent, but is known to be reserved towards strangers and other pets.

The Hierran Wolfdog in brief

Area of origin: Canary Islands, Spain
Size: 20-22 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 40-48 lbs
Lifespan: 12-14 years

8. Amazonian Short-Eared Dog

Short-eared dogs (also known as Short-eared Zorros and Small-eared dogs) are a lesser-known and relatively rare breed, native to the Amazon rainforest in South America. Their social structure, mating habits and lifespan are similar to those of domestic dogs. They were first studied in 1984 in Panama by German biologist Sigi Weisel and a Panamanian from the Embera-Wounaan group.

 

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